Live Reporting: City Radio

On Tuesday 26th May, the bank holiday weekend was firmly thrust aside as the two-week radio station simulation began at City University London.

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My role for this particular day was to be a reporter!

I covered the story of Ryanair’s full-year results report that was published that morning – I attended a morning press conference and did some lives while at the scene, and also a wrap and two-ways once I’d gotten back to base.

Here’s a rough package edit of some of my content:

Enjoy!

Bleaching in Paradise

My final project for my Masters course required me to make a 15-minute radio documentary on any subject of interest. I chose the subject of skin-whitening. 

 

The Ivory Coast has just become the third African country to ban skin-whitening creams, following in the footsteps of Senegal and South Africa.

But despite the ban, some dangerous, and even deadly, skin lightening agents are still openly sold into the UK. In Nigeria, up to 77% of women have admitted to using skin bleach.

This year according to ONS predictions, the island of Mauritius is expected to match Nigeria as one of the biggest exporters and importers of these creams.

Ashna Hurynag, has been to find out more.

For more on the topic of Shadeism, visit:

The Shady Minority‘ & ‘Shadeism. An Update

nloggg

Islington’s GP surgeries slammed for lack of translation services

My last radio report for City Vibe Radio.
Islington GP surgeries have been slammed for their lack of translation services.

I went to find out more..

City Vibe Radio

An undercover sting by voluntary medical watchdog Healthwatch Islington has revealed shocking results about language support services within Islington’s GP surgeries.

In a study by Healthwatch Islington, volunteers went to all 36 GP surgeries pretending to be new patients who did not speak English.

Just one – St Peter’s Street Medical Practice, in Islington – offered an interpreter.

The rest had no help, and 19 told them to go away and come back with a friend or relative who could speak English.

One resident told us how it made them feel:

‘They see us struggling to communicate – why don’t they use the telephone interpreting?’

Emma Whitby of Healthwatch Islington said: “Interpreting services are available to all GP practices in the borough, at no cost to individual practices”

So why are services so sparse?

With no medical providers willing to comment, City Vibe went to speak to local community support groups…

View original post 142 more words

Entertainment News

I got to record some bulletins whilst on an internship – all great experience and really helpful in showing me what I need to improve on. So here’s a sample of what I recorded, voila!

Here’s one from Friday 16th January, I give you the latest on the Brit Award nominations 2015, and fill you in on the gossip surrounding the Celebrity Big Brother house!

Immune to fangirling

“Fangirling”, (v)

1. the reaction a fangirl has to any mention or sighting of the object of her “affection”. These reactions include shortness of breath, highpitched noises, shaking etc. 

2. a gathering of two or more fangirls in which they proceed to waste endless amounts of time ogling, discussing/arguing, stalking, etc. the object of their “affection”. 

See also: 
fangirl” or “groupie

When you’re accosted by celebrities and famous faces on a daily basis, meeting Meryl Streep or Tom Jones suddenly becomes the norm.

Isn’t that a bizarre concept to the outside world?

Working in commercial radio has taught me that celebrity world can be so fickle and transient.

Spending another two weeks with what has to be the most brilliant Entertainment team in Soho has taught me a great deal more about the movie & music industries.

Starting my very first day at the launch of a popular BBC primetime singing contest was nerve-wracking as heck. I found myself at a rooftop bar of a swanky 5* hotel on the Southbank, shmoozing with other journalists sent to cover the same event.

We were hoarded in a screening room where the press were allowed to view the first episode of the show alongside the celebrities who feature in it.

There I was, student reporter, baffled at how I had swung my way in to this situation. I had been sent there to cover the event and interview the elite famous faces on behalf of 70 radio stations and print magazines. Me.

Did the thought of fluffing up or not asking the right questions, or forgetting to press record on my marantz, or annoying the talent cross my mind – ohhhh yes. But I shoved down the nerves and waltzed in to the place just like every other journo there. I couldn’t even enjoy the copious amount of free food or champagne for fear of coming across like a bumbling idiot during the interviews.

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One thing I immediately disliked was the manner of which some journos introduced themselves to one another, it went along the lines of “Hi, I’m [enter full name] from [enter some publication or station I was supposed to be slyly impressed by or jealous of]”.

So entirely false and pretentious – it was really quite unnecessary, but I quickly learnt that the Entertainment world is like that. From PR, to journalism, it seemed the Entertainment sector is full of whimsical shrubbery. A friend told me to bare in mind the infamous saying ‘if you can’t beat them, join them’ – and right he was. Thankfully though, not all were like that.

After the ‘mingling’ amongst the press, the talent did the rounds and conducted the interviews which we all had prepared our questions for. As part of the radio cluster, at 4’11 I didn’t have high hopes for squeezing some questions in there. But despite the best efforts of the journos either side of me to squish me out of the huddled cluster, it turns out my height came as a huge advantage – the talent felt sorry for me!

Take example one for instance, [WARNING: namedrop ahead] whilst suffocating in the cluster and suffering at severe elbow-bashing – singer, songwriter, producer and entrepreneur Will.I.Am takes note of me standing so off balance that he says ‘Oh my gosh, you’re so cute and small‘. To my delight and just as a knight in shining armour should, ushered me to the front of the cluster so I could breathe (and get a great position for the interview). THANKS WILL.I.AM, what a gent.

I got a great interview, and even the patronising remarks of some of the radio journos with me, ‘Ohh you’re tiny’, didn’t throw me off. Because I realised, at the end of the day, I was there to get great content and do a good job. Getting back to the office, my boss was delighted with what I’d produced, and the brands were happy.

Even though I may have been crushed and had some false friends for the day, it was all in a day’s work – and I got what I needed!

Ofcourse, it wasn’t until later when I was recounting the event to my mum, that I realised I had had an opportunity like no other.

I got to eat expensive food, be part of a selected private audience to view the esteemed show way before the public, interview ‘famous’ individuals and represent an accomplished and respected organisation!

I’m proud to have done it, and what an experience. I just hope I’ll be as immune to fangirling when interviewing Beyonce (one day).

nloggg

Work Experience Woes

So you’ve managed to bag yourself your dream work placement in a newsroom.

newsroom

Now it’s the day before, and your shaking in your boots fretting over not knowing what’s FTSE and who the President of Malawi is.

How are you going to make a great impression and leave them wanting to see more of you?

Let’s rundown how to make the best out of your one day/one week/fortnight of work experience:

1) Don’t be late.

I generally follow this rule in life anyway, but it’s definitely the number one rule for placements. Don’t stumble in a couple of minutes before or after you’re due to start.

Be prompt and be alert. Setting a good impression from the get-go will give you a great headstart. But – turning up an hour early is also not ideal.

I’d say,  if you’re going somewhere you’ve never been before, make sure you leave early to find the place in good time. Then, if you get there super early, just pop in to a coffee shop to pass some time.

Then rock up 15 minutes before your start time, fresh as a daisy and caffeine pumping through your veins.

2) Don’t wear new shoes on your first day.

Blisters and sores? No thank you. Squeezing your feet into some new loafers just aren’t worth the damage.

Plus, no one wants to see you sliding across the newsroom studio floors no matter how shiny and new your shoes may be!

That being said, don’t pull out your old tatty pair either – exercise some effort at least.

3) Carry spare batteries/charger.

The ‘vox-pop challenge’ is an editor favourite so I’ve been told. It’s the easiest task for them to set you and allows the station/channel to ‘understand their audience’.

They just want to see what you’re made of, and judge whether you’re a ‘people person’.

Getting sent out on a rainy, cold day isn’t the best thing in the world, but it’s twice the nightmare if you get to your destination, find a rare voxpopper who’s up for answering a couple of questions on a new housing development, you switch on your recorder and – BAM.

The low battery light flashes twice annnd…your all out. Great.

Grab a few AAs in your satchel, and job’s a good’un.

4) Always carry a notebook and pen.

As you’ve seen above, technology can fail us at the most poignant of times. To save yourself always carry a notebook and pen with you.

They say journalists are always skint, and I reckon it’s because roughly 73% of their entire salary is spent on notebooks! The size of the pad is up to you, but in my opinion a reporters A5 pad is best. Large enough to fit a decent amount of text on, but also small enough to take out on the job.

I can honestly say it’s got me out of a fair few sticky situations, so don’t roll your eyes at life before iPads.

5) Have some spare breakfast/snack bars in your bag.

Because you’ll thank yourself later.

6) Bring an umbrella.

Don’t think you’ll have a spare 30 minutes after your interviews to run back home, fix your barnet and run back to the office.

Such wishful musings aren’t welcome in the newsroom unfortunately.

Save yourself the bad hair day and pack an umbrella in your bag!

7) Learn names.

There’s something charming and professional about someone who remember’s everyone’s name.

The guy at security, the canteen lady, as well as everyone you meet in the newsroom.

It makes them feel good, and you feel professional (plus it’s great for networking).

8) If you don’t ask, you don’t get.

Make the most of your placement.

Find that balance between not being a pest and carving out your own experience. If you finish the work you’ve been assigned, then ask for more.

People in the newsroom will often have a lot on their plate and may be happy to delegate some work to you, but may also think your being annoying.

Read your colleagues and make it known that you’re happy to get stuck in and help people out when needed.

But most of all, enjoy it.

– A